Module 1: Principles of the Vortex Approach
'Green Zone' Quiz
Go
 
What is your first name?

 
Hi {{answer_dqUpOELPK11K}}, before we start, let's check that you're ready for the quiz.

If you haven't already, take a look at the following page of the Vortex website first.

www.VortexApproach.org/greenzone

 
If you haven't already watched the Green Zone video, please do so now, before attempting the quiz.


 
Okay {{answer_dqUpOELPK11K}}, looks like we're ready to get started.

The Vortex Approach emphasises the use of critical language - standardised communication in which specific terms or phrases have a clearly defined, mutually understood meaning. The following questions will help familiarise you with the critical language of the Vortex Approach.
 
Which of the following statements best describes what is meant by the Green Zone of the Vortex. *


 
When determining if you are in the Green Zone, which of the following suggests that alveolar oxygen delivery is 'adequate'. *


 
When determining if you are in the Green Zone, which of the following clinical signs can be used to 'confirm' alveolar oxygen delivery? *


 
What is the critical language used by the Vortex Approach to describe any time you are not in the Green Zone? *


 
Take another look at the beginning of the video {{answer_dqUpOELPK11K}}, then review your answers to the first few questions.

 
Which of the following methods to establish airway patency can potentially provide entry into the Green Zone *


 
Take another look at the Vortex graphic and see which lifelines are depicted as being adjacent to (and therefore potentially able to provide access to) the Green Zone- then review your answer to the previous question.

 
Entry into the Green Zone provides three opportunities. List them in the order they appear on the Green Zone too.

Note that the wording must EXACTLY match that used in the Green Zone tool, printed in ALL CAPS. Put spaces between words but don't add any extra spaces.
 
First opportunity:

 
Second opportunity:

 
Third opportunity:

 
Take another look at the Green Zone tool {{answer_dqUpOELPK11K}} and refresh your memory of the three opportunities the Green Zone presents, then try that question again.

Remember the sequence and words used in your answer must EXACTLY match that used in the Green Zone tool - in ALL CAPS. Put spaces between words but don't use any without any extra spaces.

 
Using entry to the Green Zone via a supraglottic airway to pass an Aintree catheter and use this to intubate the patient is an example of which category of initial strategic goal? *


 
Using entry to the Green Zone via a face mask  airway as an opportunity to optimise and prepare before attempting intubation is an example of which category of initial strategic goal? *


 
Using entry to the Green Zone via a supraglottic airway to perform a front-of-neck airway under more controlled circumstances, without the time pressure of a CICO situation, is an example of which category of initial strategic goal? *


 
Using entry to the Green Zone via a supraglottic airway to withdraw ('wake the patient')  while leaving the supraglottic airway in situ is an example of which category of initial strategic goal? *


 
Maintain refers to keeping the lifeline by which entry to the Green Zone was secured in place, making no further attempts to change it and either withdrawing ('waking the patient') or proceeding. 

Convert involves leaving the lifeline by which entry to the Green Zone was achieved in and using it to switch to a more appropriate airway - without ever intending to leave the Green Zone.

Replace involves forgoing access to the Green Zone and rte-entering the funnel of the Vortex  with the expectation that replacing that lifeline with a more appropriate alternate lifeline will be able to provide a return to the Green Zone.

With that in mind, review your answers to the last few questions.

 
Being on a low 'tier' of the Green Zone refers to: *


 
This image depicts being on a 'low tier' of the Green Zone.

Note that even though the Green Zone has been entered after a large number of lifelines/optimisations have been exhausted, the airway obtained may be stable and the saturations obtained may still be good (e.g. if intubation was ultimately achieved).

Conversely if the Green Zone is entered via a supraglottic airway that does not appear to be sitting correctly (as evidenced by leaking and a small triangular ETCO2 trace) and there were concerns that the airway could be lost again, then (irrespective of the SpO2 or how many attempts it took to get into the Green Zone) the grasp on the Green Zone would be described as 'tenuous'. 

With this in mind review your answer to the last question.


 
Congratulations {{answer_dqUpOELPK11K}}, you've achieved a perfect score in the Green Zone Quiz!

Powered by Typeform